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Eliot Ullman is quoted in an article about the Earned Income Tax Credit that appeared on the Alert Investor web site on March 27, 2017.


Michael Eisenberg comments on uncertainty over the Affordable Care Act's health insurance coverage requirement and tax related penalty in the February 24, 2017 California Healthline syndicated column Ask Emily. 


Michael Eisenberg explains why it's important to keep your tax returns for a long time in this January 20, 2017 article by The Washington Post.


Consider the recreational or educational activities available when deciding where to retire advises Michael Eisenberg in this January 9, 2017 article in the Journal of Accountancy.


Michael Eisenberg offers advice on harvesting your losses in this December 20, 2016 article published by American Funds.


Michael Eisenberg offers insight on the current rise in the personal financial satisfaction level in this October 27, 2016 article from the Journal of Accountancy.


Why not use social media to garner envy over how you've accomplished a financial milestone rather than just posting photos of your latest vacation?  Michael Eisenberg suggests a different outlook on using social media in a September 1, 2016 article by the AICPA.


This article from the September 1, 2016 Los Angeles Times reveals how most high school and college students are woefully unprepared to handle financial tasks such as saving, budgeting, managing credit or investing.


While the Personal Financial Satisfaction Index (PFSi) is up, Michael Eisenberg is cautious of political instability in a July 28, 2016 article published in the Journal of Accountancy.


Michael Eisenberg and Innovative Wealth Advisors are quoted in this June 28, 2016 U.S. News & World Report article on how to baby step your way to savings.


Here's an overview of the economic issues surrounding the Brexit, and what this historic decision could mean for the United Kingdom, world trade, and international investors.


Michael Eisenberg and Miller Ward & Company are mentioned in this May 31, 2016 article which appeared on mainstreet.com.


While Personal Financial Satisfaction has dipped recently, Michael Eisenberg explains the importance of staying focused in a report issued April 27, 2016 by the AICPA.


Michael Eisenberg is quoted in this April 28, 2016 CNBC.com article about how earning an allowance can teach kids a lesson in financial responsibility.


Michael Eisenberg and Miller Ward & Company were mentioned in a USA TODAY article which appeared on February 19, 2016 about how to choose a tax preparer.


Michael Eisenberg is prominently quoted in this January 19, 2016 Los Angeles Times story on how the latest Powerball winner is proceeding with caution as to how to protect and make the best use of his financial windfall.


In early 2016 President Obama signed a stopgap highway bill that included changes to the income tax laws.


The IRS has released the 2018 optional standard mileage rates to be used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, medical, moving and charitable purposes. Beginning on January 1, 2018, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car, van, pickup of panel truck will be:

  • 54.5 cents per mile for business miles driven (up from 53.5 cents in 2017);
  • 18 cents per mile for medical and moving expenses (up from 17 cents in 2017); and
  • 14 cents per mile for miles driven for charitable purposes (permanently set by statute at 14 cents).

Comment. A taxpayer may not use the business standard mileage rate after using a depreciation method under Code Sec. 168 or after claiming the Code Sec. 179 deduction for that vehicle. A taxpayer may not use the business rate for more than four vehicles at a time. As a result, business owners have a choice for their vehicles: take the standard mileage rate, or “itemize” each part of the expense (gas, tolls, insurance, etc., and depreciation).


January 1, 2018 not only brings a new year, it brings a new federal Tax Code. The just-passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act makes sweeping changes to the nation’s tax laws. Many of these changes take effect January 1. Everyone – especially individuals and business owners – needs to review their tax strategies for the new law. The changes are huge. However, many changes are temporary, especially for individuals.


The start of a New Year presents a time to reflect on the past 12 months and, based on what has gone before, predict what may happen next. Here is a list of the top 10 developments from 2017 that may prove particularly important as we move forward into the New Year:


The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act modifies Section 529 qualified tuition plans to allow the plans to distribute up to $10,000 in tuition expenses incurred during the tax year for designated beneficiaries enrolled at a public, private, or religious elementary or secondary school. Section 529 plans used to only be allowed for college tuition, up to full tuition amounts. That provision for college tuition remains the same.


Yes, conversions from regular (traditional) tax-deferred individual retirement accounts (IRAs) to Roth IRAs are still allowed after enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. In fact, in some instances, such Roth conversions are more beneficial than they were prior to 2018, since the tax rates on all income, including conversion income, are now lower. However, the special rule that allows a contribution to one type of an IRA to be recharacterized as a contribution to the other type of IRA will no longer apply to a conversion contribution to a Roth IRA after 2017.


As an individual or business, it is your responsibility to be aware of and to meet your tax filing/reporting deadlines. This calendar summarizes important federal tax reporting and filing data for individuals, businesses and other taxpayers for the month of January 2018.